Monday, August 19, 2013

Regency Bodiced Petticoat


 Oh deary- undergarements are not as exciting as full-blown ball gowns!
Yes, that is true. I am sure this post is NOT AS thrilling as it could be, but, if you are a fanatic about historical clothes, you will know one cannot forget the clothes which go UNDER everything else.
I have never really made a bodiced petticoat because I thought "How boring!" but when I got into the project, I really had fun!
First-some inspirtation:

Etsy:
Historkia
WednesdaysChildIs

Pinterest:

Also-RomanticHistory blog has an awesome repro that the lovely Sarah Jane made!
For a tutorial on how to make an easy bodiced petticoat to Sensibility Patterns for help!

There were several decision to make when I began this project, since I was making my own pattern up, and not basing it on a pre-exsisting one. I would suggest you ask them yourself if you are wanting to make a bodiced petticoat:

1.What type of neckline-scooped or square?
2. Fitted bodiced petticoat, or drawstring?
3. If  the latter on question #2,  Drawstring on neck and waist or just waist?
4.Buttons in back? Or hook and eyes? (also have seen a lacing petticoat-go here to see ZipZips tutorial)
5. Boning in bodice?, or no boning?-thus to allow you to wear separate stays.
6. How low a neckline in front and back do you need to accommodate the gowns you will be wearing over this?
7. Will I use the lining to enclose the neck edges? If so, will I bind the sleeves-or bind both sleeves and neckline?

My petticoat took about a week or two to complete-and that was me being very divided in my attention to it. My sis had TONS of mending and refashioning for me to do before she left for college. Plus, I have become the local repair shop for teenage boys whose skateboarding and free-running Parkour obsessions leave there pants in serious disrepair. I usually get the same pair of jeans or sweats back several times-patching up the damage in layers!
Suffice all this to say-that the petticoat is really a 2-3 day job if your a quick sewer, and a week or less if you are a slow sewer. Just make sure you have a pattern planned out (your own or a pre-exsisting patten) and you can construct it quickly.
A great resource if you are handsewing-or you can do this on machines too-is to learn how to make flat-felled seams:


 I did not take the time to flat-fell anything-I was naughty and serged everything-bad Lexi!

I used 100% cotton.

The bodice has two darts, is lined, the necklines joined together right sides together and then turned through and top stitched. I went with a low scoop shape with the straps on the edges of my shoulder to allow for a wide-necked ball gown!


The skirt is pleated in the back, extending to the side-seams and then flat across the tummy-area. I DID build-in a slight amount of ease for waist drawstring (to allow for changes in size!) so the front LOOKS slightly gathered.
sThe armholes  are bound with self-binding from left-over fabric scrap.

The back dice dips down in back a bit-because I do not want competing waistline that have fullness, hitting at the same point.

The back bodice is even lower-cut than the front accommodate the low-back or a certain ballgown I own!
It closes with hook and eyes (the metal closures) and the edges meet tip-to-tip.
The meeting edges allow the drawstring to meet and tie evenly-which they would not do in the case of the sides overlapping with buttons.


Here is a detail shot of the inside of the dress. (notice the serged waist-line seam which is turned up and stitched to make drawstring channel.)Please note my petticoat opens in the back-but there are lots of people who make them open in the front!
Notice the metal closures I sewed! The hooks (above)
The eyes (below) (they are spaced close together for strength)
I hope you enjoyed this!
Much love,
LEXI












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